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An incredible effort from the @_CollegeHouse_ boys. We are aiming for 700 kilometres on the ergo as a group. We are raising money for The Kikunduku School Project (GAP AFRICA). @ShiplakeCollege @BurrHouse @SkipwithHouse @EverettShiplake @WelshHouse @ShipOrch @Gilson_House https://t.co/bAgsJdiTeT Posted on Mar 22
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#4 - 1961

We adore this ‘unofficial’ school magazine circulated by pupils in 1961. From the write up of the Henley Royal Regatta, to the champion bubble blower - this is a great insight in to College life from a pupil perspective in 1961.

1961 was very much a year of firsts:

• The Prefect System was established, led by the College's first Head of the School, P H Morkel.

• The Cadet Force was established.

• Other societies and clubs also started up, including Photographic Club, the Young Farmers' Club.

• The first Dramatic Society was founded.

The Phoenix, the School's first literary magazine, was published in June 1960.

• The first editions of official (below) and unofficial (above) magazines were also published. The Court publication included a quiz - how many of these are you able to answer? (click on the link to find the answers on page 22)

(1) What the fields on the other side of the Thames from the School are called? 

(2) Who has the right of appointing Vicars of Shiplake? 

(3) Who won the Grand Challenge Cup at Henley in 1961? 

(4) Is there any connection between the Baskerville Family of Crowsley Court and Conan Doyle's novel "Hound of the Baskervilles"? 

(5) Who is the French Revolutionary General buried in Henley Parish Church? 

(6) What sides fought at the Battle of Caversham Bridge and when? 

(7) What 15th Century Bridge recently proved to be more sound than an iron bridge built a century ago? 

(8) Who burned down Wargrave Church in 1913? 

(9) What happened to the last Abbot of Reading? 

(10) Why Shiplake Memorial Hall is so called?  

• The School Orchestra made its first public performance:

"The climax of the concert came with the first appearance of the School Orchestra, twenty-four strong, who played "Four Dances" by Claude Gervaise arranged by Healey. It was quite a thrill to hear them for the first time particularly since the majority of the orchestra had only been learning their instruments for about six months. The ovation they received at the end of the concert was very well deserved". (extracted from a review in the first issue of The Court magazine)